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for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news america." >> this is bbc world news america. reporting from washington, i'm kathy kaye. the white house says it will push from -- for tighter gun control days after the school shooting shattered new town. they tried to help children and five women are shot dead in pakistan simply for distributing polio vaccines. jansing into the future decades ne o one electronic superhighway long before many even knew he was being built. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and elsewhere around the globe. four days after the mass shootings in newtown, conn., the funerals continue for the 22 becomes lost their lives. and while the town mourns, the white house issued its strongest indication yet it will be pushing for tighter gun controls, including reinstating the assault weapons ban. from newtown, we begin our coverage. >> she loved or go wales and horses. a beautiful girl, her parents said. 6-year-old jessica was buried. another victim in america. that terrible friday as parents waited to
and whispering that "this is beauty, this is humanity, this is america." >> announcer: funding is provided by -- carnegie corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fun with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. f park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. more information at" anne gumowitz. the betsy and jesse fink foundation. the hkh foundation. barbara g. fleischman. and by our sole corporate sponsor, mutual of america, designing customized individual and group retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. >> welcome. junot diaz is known to start conversations some folks would r
>> this is "bbc world news america." funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news america." >> hello and welcome to "bbc world news." a very happy new year 2013. it is already a first of january were you are, this is the greek capital and they're celebrating going around the acropolis. various time zones are coming into the year 2013 and we will keep you up-to-date. not a lot to look at their in athens but we will show you the scene in capital across the next few hours on bbc. there is still a lot of work going on on capitol hill. president obama said a deal is in sight to stop america going over the so-called fiscal cliff. congress officials have said the house of representati
. and by our sole corporate sponsor, mutual of america, designing customized individual and group retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. >> welcome. sometimes we can see the universe in a grain of sand, as the old saying goes, but nowadays a graphic chart more vividly reveals the world we live in. take a look at this statistical snapshot of the media ecology that largely determines what you and i see, read, and hear. in 1983, 50 corporations controlled a majority of media in america. in 1990 the number had dropped to 23. in 1997, 10. and today, six. there you have it -- the fistful of multinational conglomerates that own the majority of media in america. what do we call it when a few firms dominate the market? oligopoly. doesn't quite rhyme with democracy. but today, believe it or not, big media is about to get even bigger, unless the public stands up and says "no!" here's the story. the chairman of the federal communications commission -- the fcc, the agency of government created by congress to protect the public's rightful ownership of the airwaves -- is reportedly
. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news america." >> this is bbc world news america. reporting from washington, i'm kathy kaye. supporters and opponents in egypt of president morsi fight outside the palace in cairo. villages are flattened and hundreds are killed. and remembering the legendary jazzd of dave brubeck, pianist whose impact went far beyond the world of music. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and elsewhere around the globe. in egypt tonight, pitched battles on the streets of cairo and -- between supporters and opponents of the president there. there have been violent clashes for the second day outside the presidential power us -- palace in cairo. demonstrators have been during petrol bombs. four senior advisers have resigned. what are the chances for a peaceful resolution? that is the question i asked the state department spokesman p.j. crowley. >> we have had the former head of the iaea suggesting that morsi is now worse than hosni mubarak. is getting quite tense there, isn't it? >> it is. and the tension between institutions is actu
signals, and then we are off. >> reporter: in most of america, u.p.s. drivers spend a lot of time behind the wheel. not tony. he parks his truck less than two miles away for the whole day. >> i prefer to park and uh let my legs do the work, you know what i mean? >> reporter: today, tony is lucky to have the help of angel tirado, a seasonal worker. so, it's angel who delivers dozens of heavy boxes to a garment warehouse. meanwhile, tony minds the truck and gets ready for the next delivery, offering up some tips of the trade: like the importance of making friends in the buildings. >> at least once a week, every one of my freight guys, they're going to get a coffee from me. once in a while, you know, i'll go get like a couple of sandwiches. i mean, they make my life a whole lot easier. i want them liking me! >> reporter: after a while, i persuade tony to let me deliver two packages to a building across the street. that means, i'm also responsible for the diad-- the electronic clipboard tracking all the packages. i have two packages for you. >> great. >> reporter: and i need you to sign. wit
corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news america." >> this is bbc world news america. reporting from washington, kathy kaye. egypt's president says his heart is heavy, but he promises there will be no return to the days of dictatorship lighting a joint is now legal in washington. >> i hope that nobody in the world will be sent to prison for taking drugs ever again. i hope that anybody who lies a drug problem will get help. >> and he is the monster of concrete with curbs. capitald his nation's and touched the world. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. after days of demonstrations, the egyptian president has appeared on national television to try to allay fears over his leadership. muhamed morsi said dialogue was needed to solve this crisis. he has invited all major political factions to a meeting on saturday. but he is refusing to rescind his sweeping new powers in a constitution drafted by his allies. here is the latest. >> thanks and barbara are outside the presidential palace in cairo. after a night of violence, the republica
on word of a potential settlement, bank of america. its shares added a quarter, to $11.60. it was the biggest winner on the dow this year. some positive analyst comments on facebook sent shares higher. b.m.o. capital says it's doubling its price target to $32 a share. it says facebook may benefit from a pick up in ad spending. facebook added $0.70 to $26.60. it looks like apple's mini ipad is a big hit in china. apple's stores both on the mainland and in hong kong are reportedly either out of stock or have tight supplies. apple climbed nearly 4.5% to close at $532. some big changes over the weekend at zynga. the online game maker slashed 11 games from its library as part of its cost-cutting plans. shares of zynga were up just $0.03 to a little more than $2, well below their $10 i.p.o. price from last december. cal-maine foods slipped nearly 10% after the egg producer reported a drop in prices and higher feed costs. shares were down more than $4 to $40. oliffs natural resourd tkeac n some decent gains on the back of some positive manufacturing data from china. cliff's ta
. fleischmann and by our sole corporate sponsor, mutual of america, designing group, individual, and retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. >>> welcome. the bells rang for the lost. charlotte bacon, olivia engle, anna marquez green, catherine hubbard, emilie parker, jack pinto, noah posner, jessica ricos, benjamin wheeler, and allison wyatt. all were 6 years old. daniel barden and grace mcdonald were 7. six adults died with them. mary sherlock, dawn hochsprung, victoria soto. it helps to say their names to rescue them from the statistical anonymity that always settles over these awful events. it helps those of us distanced from the loss to imagine to even grieve the emptiness of the homes and hearts of those who loved them. we will never forget. we mourn, move on, and too soon forget. then it will happen again some day. we'll scratch our heads and ask ourselves, was the last time newtown or columbine? was it aurora or that college in virginia? once again, we will mourn, move on, and too soon forget. there is an old saying that in remembrance is the secret of redemption.
is not the start of a new ve aofls crfe america. the nation's job market may not be robust, but it's not frozen, either. in fact, today, the payroll firm a.d.p. reported 118,000 new private sector jobs were added in november, fewer than in october. the blame for last month's slowdown in hiring falls squarely on hurricane sandy, not on any new or widespread weakness in the economy. >> i would expect that by december, we're going to see some bounce back. much of the disruption from sandy was people simply not being able to get to work or firms not employing people that they ordinarily would have. >> reporter: friday, the government will report it's monthly snapshot of the u.s. labor market. it, too, is likely to reflect temporary effects related to the aftermath of hurricane sandy. >> we're looking for only a 50,000 gain in jobs in november, well under that 170,000 average we've seen over the past three months. >> reporter: hurricane sandy's effects on hiring may be short- lived, but experts worry fiscal cliff concerns could result in a new storm brewing for workers looking to land a job in the c
-- proud to make america work. for more information about afge and membership, visit >> what do you think a tree can be? can it be stronger than steel? can a tree be biodegradable plastic? can it be fuel for our cars or clothing or medicine that fights cancer? with our tree cell technology, we think it can. weyerhaeuser, growing our roots. [applause] >> this week on "inside washington," the thrill of victory -- >> barack obama has been reelected the 44th president. >> the agony of defeat. >> this election is over, but our principles under. >> the year 2012 in review. >> the supreme court has upheld the requirement that every american by insurance. >> the year of the cliffhanger. >> raising tax rates is unacceptable. >> of natural disasters. >> it is like the apocalypse. >> and human tragedies. >> they are saying someone is shooting in the auditorium. >> of political fumbles. >> i have five seconds before you interrupted me. >> and shoppers. >> the seriousness of having a cia director involved in an extramarital affair cannot be overplayed. >> as we look back, let's begin with th
confiscated guns, that's not going to happen in america. i'm sorry, it's not. >> there is plenty of evidence to look at here. when there's -- not study that tells you that banning guns decreases suicide or mass murders, just not. and center for disease control and others have looked for those they can't get them. the fact is when you have -- >> the cdc is not allowed to collect information -- on weapons as a -- when studies have been done on behalf of cdc other arms of the federal government none of them show that taking guns out decreases suicide or these other things. we have to look at the fact also that when you allow guns in to communities mining whether it's concealed weapon or people allowed to have gun in their home you see usually a crime rate drop. does all crime stop? >> there's no causation here. >> the fact is people want to have the right to defend themselves and i think it's wrong, whether you agree with the nra statement on this or not i think it's worth considering that it's true, when everybody knees if i walk in to that venue whether it's a school, it's a church, it's a pr
they doing. you have america the most powerful nation in the planet and you have this guy. i take people behind the scenes to see whattate would be like to be an officer and what it would be like to be tracking osama, and me you did it. >> rose: kathryn bigelow and mark boal coming up. fcglfv@ captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> good evening. tonight i can roar to the american people and to the world that the united states has conducted an operation that killed osama bin laden, the leader of al-qaeda. and a terrorist who is responsible for the murder of thousands of innocent men, women and children. for over two decades, bin laden has been al-qaeda's leader and symbol, and continued plot attacks against our countries, friends and allies. the death of bin laden signifies the most significant achievement to date in our effort counterterrorisms professionals to work tire loalsly to achieve this outcome. the american people do not see their work nor know their names but tonight they feel the satisfaction of their work and t
so they can continue to do what they do. >> you know, we do exaggerate in america all the time. so now we are locavore, you know local food and now we get totally crazy with organic to the point where i have been to restaurants where they practically come and introduce you to the carrot. that carrot was born on the 7th of may, we named it hilda. we can get exaggerated. too. >> rose: great chefs for an hour captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: let me start off. tell me what makes -- what makes a great restaurant? how do you -- >> well, what makes a great restaurant i don't know exactly. a great restaurant i think is where the owner and the chef gives all the love he can. >> rose: when does your day start? >> ooh, sometimes 8:00, sometimes 9:00, sometimes 7:00. >> rose: what's the first thing you do? >> oh, it changes a little bit. i stop at the office for 15 minutes and then i go down and look if everything is holding and look -- >> rose: see i had this impression of all of you at the fish market at 4:00 a.m. e
something. here we are two years later, another 21,000 people in america killed with guns. we've done nothing. i mean, you know, i don't know at what point you have to say enough is enough. we've been killing 34 americans every single day. that's bigger than virginia tech. every single day. and you done cover it because it's 34 separate occurrences around the country. and it doesn't grab the public's imagination, psyche, sympathy, there's just-- you don't get a visceral reaction when it's people you don't know and can't see. >> rose: have we got that now, the visceral reaction that this is somehow different because it children. >> i sure hope so i was asked today is it different with children. it is in the public psyche. but i think if you talk to the families of teenagers and even adults who were killed before the sympathyes with their loss is exactly the same as the parents of young people. but young people that people look and say oh my god what are we really doing here. >> rose: what is your criticism of the president of the united states? >> well, i don't know that criticism is t
of these incidents happening in america makes me say, you know, enough is enough. there's got to be a rational way to sort through this. i'm not saying i've got a perfect piece of legislation. i don't think there is a single perfect piece of legislation. but in a country where we got 30,000 gun deaths a year, there's got to be a way that we can do a bit more. i hope that responsible gun owners around america will join in this conversation as well. i think we have to recognize that it is about rational appropriate gun rules but also about mental health issues. my hope is our country takes a deep breath and doesn't just simply get exercised by this for a few moments and then push this horrible tragedy back into the background and forget about it. >> ifill: assuming that there is is not one single solution here, let's talk about what you mean when you say rational gun control. senator feinstein says an assault weapons ban would be rational. would you agree with that? >> i think that from the evidence i've seen that a lot of the challenge comes around the speed by which you can shoot... in effect, you
. ♪ >> rose: he is in new york to, bolivar orchestra in carnegie called, voices from latin america, also dedicated further musical education and social justice around the world, i am pleased to have gustavo dudamel at this table for the first time. >> thank you. it is an honor. >> rose: my pleasure. >> huge honor. >> rose: we have been wanting to do this for a while. tell me about the music you have selected for the performance. >> yes. this is a festival called dos americas here in new york, and we decide to bring, you know, this amazing music that we have, this very latin, in a ways of irs stick but deep music by es at the vek, villalobos, by ar bon, carlos chavez, so for us it is very important to show the soul of our music also, also to play the strauss ballad, but especially, you know, our music. >> rose: tell me about the music of venezuela. >> well, look, what we are bringing is the -- i think it is the most important piece right in venezuela, by michael estevez and a piece for a big choir, two soloist, a tenor and a baritone. >> a huge orchestra, you can feel what is about our cu
charter schools that aim to be the model-ts of education. >> america has lots of terrific schools. people open great schools every year, but they typically open just one. nobody has figured out how to mass produce high quality, cost effective schools. >> brown: we remember general norman schwarzkopf-- the man who commanded american-led forces in the persian gulf war known as "desert storm." >> warner: plus, mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the final weekend has now arrived before the fiscal cliff hits on new year's day and wit
. fleischman. and by our sole corporate sponsor, mutual of america, designing customized individual and group retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. >> welcome. lately i've had phaedra on my mind. not the greek myth of the tragic daughter of that name, but the retelling of the story in a 1962 movie starring tony perkins and melina mercouri. their illicit affair over, perkins crashes his cherished roadster over a cliff. a big sendoff accompanied by none other than johann sebastian bach. >> oh john sebastian! you're playing your music like crazy and i'm listening to it in greece! what are you doing here? oh john! why aren't you home minding the children? i at least had some business in greece! i had a father that killed every phaedra! phaedra! phaedra! >> that scene actually keeps coming to mind as i try to follow the melodrama in washington that has us heading for a cliff. a fiscal cliff. but are we? or is this, another myth in the making? for some insight, we turn to two seasoned observers both of whose books you'll want to as santa to leave in your stocking. bruce bar
parent. and that was especially true today. i know there's not a parent in america who doesn't feel the same overwhelming grief that i do. the majority of those who died today were children. beautiful little kids between the ages of five an ten years old. they had their entire lives ahead of them. birthdays, graduations, weddings, kids of their own. among the fallen were also teachers, men and women without devoted their lives to helping our children fulfill their dreams. so our hearts are broken today. for the parents and grandparents, sisters and brothers of these little children, and for the families of the adults who were lost. our hearts are broken for the parents of the survivors as well. for as blessed as they are to have their children home tonight, they know that their children's innocence has been torn away from them too early. and there are no words that will ease their pain. as a country we have been through this too many times. whether it's in elementary school in newton or a shopping mall in oregon or a temp el in wisconsin, or a movie these never aurora or a street co
businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now "bbc world news america." an indian woman who was gang raped in delhi has died at. last-minute talks at the white house over the fiscal cliff ends with no announcement of a deal. a 6-year-old british girl abducted by her father and taken to pakistan is reunited with her mother in the u.k. welcome to "bbc world news." also to come, no where to pray for moslems in athens. and a quite at hollywood that revolution, making big returns to the silver screen. >>> breaking news coming to us from singapore. in the past few minutes, it was just announced that the indian woman who was gang raped in delhi earlier this month that has caused national average has died. she was being treated at a hospital in singapore where she was on life-support. in india, her brutal attack triggered nationwide protests. the authorities struggling to contain the growing anger. we have received a statement from a doctor, the chief executive of the hospital where she was being looked after. "we are very sad to report the patient passed away peacefully a
to introduce the world to latin america and music? >> oh, absolutely, of course. but look, for us the most important thing is to put our music in the same level of how to say, of importance, as beethoven, as or nono, especially talking about modern composers. because when we talk about our music we are talking about music of the 20th century. especially 20th century and that is the important thing. can't you imagine, i was thinking this this is all new music for many people, you know. the concerts are sold out. you know, it's something very special because people are coming with this kind of question, you know, with this kind of what we will listen. but i think at the same time they think that will be something very special. and for us the most important thing is not of course it's the orchestra, but its music. how important is this music, to bring this music for people that are not close to that. >> rose: how was it founded? >> it was founded by maestro antonio, in 1975, i think, started as a program for young musician. we have a great organize tra in venezuela. this organize tra sim foni
. gwen: good evening. 2012 was a remarkable year one that was shaped by other exploration of america's essential divide, red vs. blue, yes. but also red vs. red. congress vs. the white house and when it came to foreign policy, whether and how to intervene. we begin, of course, with election 2012. >> thank you, new hampshire. tonight we made history. he is the worst republican in the country to put up against barack obama. >> if you've got a business, you didn't build that. >> president obama promised to begin to slow the rise of the oceans and to heal the planets. my promise is to help you and your family. >> when you pick up that ballot to vote, you will face the clearest choice of any time in a generation. >> there are 47% of the people who will vote for the president no matter what. 47% who are with him. >> i have just called president obama to congratulate him on his victory. >> and whether i earned your vote or not, i have listened to you. i have learned from you. and you've made me a better president. >> when a president is seeking a second term voters have clear options, stay
in the world in the united states of america. that is something that has to be different. one other point about newtown. dylan shockley was 6 years old. he was a special-education student. his parents issued a statement. we take great solace that dylan died in the loving arms of his favorite teacher, a special- education teacher, anne marie murphy. 52, mother of four. the teachers of that school, the principal, psychologist, the teacher that by protecting their children, saving their children, comforting their children, those that survived, they are true heroes. they have not received the recognition that they deserve. i would point out, everyone of them is a public schoolteacher. a group that has been condemned, vilified, and denigrated by all sorts of people. >> i do wonder about this nexus we are making between mental illness and violence. we have had a number of gun -- violence where people were killed with fire arms, in prince george's county, too. are you suggesting that everyone who pulls a trigger is mentally ill? is that the suggestion? >> no. >> in mass killings, you look at jared lou
the world, it's fascinating. european leaders, asian leaders, they all say to me, america actually is poorest to be the world leader for another century. if we can fix some of this political dysfunction. and there are some very simple steps that we can take. number one, let's not raise taxes on middle class families. that's something we could do right now. number two, let's have a smart long term deficit reduction program that includes us doing some things right now that would help with job creation. number three let's not manufacture another debt ceiling crises and number four let's make sure that we're making the kind of investments in education and work force development, energy independence, infrastructure and research and ur enses tha ensures that we're innovating as we have in the past. >> rose: julianna goldman of bloomberg joins me from washington and she interviewed president obama on tuesday. that was an excerpt from her interview and i'm pleased to have her on this program. and congratulations first of all. >> charlie thanks very much. it was a great opportunity. >> ros
. there have been north of 300,000 layoffs. you have seen it at u.b.s., bank of america, which is strug ling with the own acquisitions. you have even seen it at goldman sacs, one of the winners after the financial crisis. it's actually, if you talk to these bank c.e.o.s they will tell you it's a difficult time to run a multinational bank. even with the bailout, and interest rates of 0 for four years, even when they offer you and me nothing on our savings and checking accounts they say in their own defense, we're dealing with unprecedented regulation. we have to curb proprietary trading. we have regulators breathing down our neck and it's hard to earn an extra buck in that environment. you're seeing citi, in fact, address those concerns in the layoff announcement today. >> ifill: what does that tell bus the health of the banking sector and whether other big banking institution might be following suit? >> citigroup is not as mump an indicator species as i think people would want it to be. 15 years ago, it was the financial supermarket. it rolled everything together. it's one-stop shopping, and
that in retailing in america. >> reporter: stores like sur la table are expected to be one of the few bright spots in an otherwise lackluster holiday season for merchants. in fact, some experts think home goods will be hotter than toys this holiday season. ibm projects home goods will see the strongest sales growth this year, up over 6%. that's far more than toys and electronics. >> you may ask yourself, why home? we think home is up because of a lot of things-- things like the changing demographic of the home itself. there's a stat that says that 41% of those between 25 and 29 are living back at home. >> reporter: but there also a second reason. >> we think that this holiday people are buying what they need vs. what they want. >> reporter: which had me wondering what's on jack schwefel's wish list this holiday season. it wasn't this $5,500 coffee maker. >> there are some new knives that i'm actually pretty excited about, so probably those. they're cutting board material actually used in the handle of the knives. >> reporter: and there's no denying it will look good sur la table at this holiday se
it is a savior for america's economic -- >> that's why it was perfect for us because the stakes are so incredibly high so you want to put that pressure on which is the real pressure being put on these communities, high stakes poker that is a great place to set a story like this, w are we and where do we find ourselves today. >> rose: which is your story. >> exactly. >> what is the story? the story is matt's character, steve, comes into this small town and what we find out at the beginning of the movie is that steve's character is from a small town himself and actually had industry in that town, a caterpillar plant which shut down and just hollowed out the entire town financially and otherwise so he knows what these people are going through and how much they need financial help so he believes he is doing the right thing by going into these towns and offering them money to lease -- to drill on the land, and so then the town basically turns out to be a little more savvy and decide that that is not necessarily what they want, and then the debate begins. and my character is named dustin, and environm
of the hour. america's new point man in the middle east. brokering a ceasefire between israel and gaza. since then he's granted himself unlimited power. and rushed through a draft constitution branded by liberals and christians as a betrayal of egypt's transition to democracy. morsi's muslim brotherhood had 70 years in egypt's political wilderness to prepare for government. though his supporters point out that his religiously-worded constitution will easily pass in a referendum set for later this month. >> ( translated ): why are they always afraid of the ballot box? whenever there is an election or a referendum they're afraid of the ballot box. it is because they know the people are not on their side. >> reporter: tahrir square was far from full today. egypt's had its revolution and that, for many, will suffice. yet the president's opponents say another may now be required. >> ( translated ): we didn't have a revolution just to return to the era of mubarak and worse. >> ( translated ): mohamed morsi has divided the nation. we want him to fall. along with the muslim brotherhood because they a
in north america, in the middle class, making a very high income. as soon as we take that into the ancient world, we are totally lost, because, first of all, there was no middle class in the ancient world. there were the "haves" and the "have nots," to put it very simply. and in the anthropology of peasant societies, to say that somebody is an artisan or a carpenter is not to compliment them. it is to say that they are lower in the pecking order than a peasant farmer. >> narrator: very few scholars now believe that jesus was of such lowly birth. >> i'm not entirely convinced that we could characterize jesus as... as a peasant. i think that that probably miscasts jesus, especially in view of the more recent discoveries at sepphoris and elsewhere. >> he must be someone in the artisan class if he's working in the building industry. and in all probability, that would mean where he might grow up and live in nazareth, he likely went to sepphoris to earn his living. and this puts him in the interesting mix of cultures that would have been the daily life of a city like sepphoris-- through the mark
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)